Conferences, an Anxious Wait and Typo Demons

And they're off! No, not the horses in the Cup; that's well behind us as you read this (but congratulations if you won anything in your office sweeps - my horse came first, second and third. Granted, my office is my lounge room, and I drew every horse).

No, I mean the registrations for the 2013 National Editors Conference in Perth, which are now open. If you made it to the 2011 conference in Sydney, or any of the earlier conferences, you'll know that it's set to be a fantastic couple of days of discussion, education, networking and socialising with your fellow editors from around the country, and possibly the world! Editors Victoria encourages as many of you as possible to go west next year. Read more details here.

If you're keen to travel further than WA, applications are now invited for the 2013 Unwin Trust Fellowship, which enables a member of the Australian book trade to visit the UK for up to three months. Get more details here.

In the more immediate future, though, the editors who sat last month's accreditation exam should find out before Christmas if they passed (although don't take my word on that; I'm not doing the marking). We look forward to welcoming a new cohort of AEs soon.

Source: http://www.weinberg.northwestern.edu/alumni/crosscurrents/2012-spring-summer/articles/gossip-isnt-idle.html

But if you don't end up joining the ranks of AE this year, feel free to blame Titivillus (that's him, above). Sometimes dubbed the patron demon of scribes, Titivillus is a hieroglyphist's scapegoat who seems to have copped much of the blame for errors in written works during the Middle Ages. He's also known for tattling on idle gossips.

Whether or not Titivillus was the patron demon of wordsmiths, he certainly seems to be an ancestor of our own John Bangsund's delightful fiend Muphry. For 50 years, apparently, every edition of The Oxford English Dictionary "listed an incorrect page reference for, of all things, a footnote on the earliest mention of Titivillus". Or so says the author of Medieval Calligraphy: Its History and Technique, if you believe Wikipedia.

I like to imagine the two of them, conspiring together and giggling evilly into their cupped hands (or claws or hooves or whatever demons have. Can you cup hooves?). Anyway, here is some background information on Titivillus, if you're interested.

And if there are any typos in this month's newsletter, you know who's to blame!

But on a more serious note, if you do have concerns about your exam results, IPEd's exam Q&A page has details about lodging an appeal. We hope you don't have to follow that link.

Melanie Sheridan